Design

Concrete Stack and Glass House

Concrete Stack and Glass House


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This Glass House, by NAF Architect Design, located in Hiroshima, Japan, is based around a basic stacking system of concrete blocks each measuring 1.0 m x 1.0 m x 1.5m. The concrete is placed one on top of the other like simple building blocks, resulting in an unusual structure that displays varying degrees of undulation pattern.

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Surplus factory cement is readily reused in Hiroshima rather than discarding, and as this nature of block can be manufactured at any standard cement factory in the area, this selection of building material is a cheap one, though rather time constraining; the construction of this dwelling depended fully on the operation situation of the surrounding factories and the pace at which these blocks could be obtained.

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In order to lift the blocks by crane, a groove was cut on the surface of the blocks, and when the blocks were stacked vertically this groove also became a place to slot reinforcing steel rods to provide earthquake resistance.

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Sheet glass walls have been installed to form the weatherproof perimeter of the living quarters.

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The structure appears cold and industrial at present, but the intention is to plant numerous vines of various flowers along the harsh gray blocks, which will transform the structure into a hill of greenery and natural beauty in future years.

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Watch the video: The Glass House in Oakville, Canada (May 2022).